TT Furious Tourbillon

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TT Furious Tourbillon

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Print Profile(4)

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P1S
P1P
X1
X1 Carbon
X1E
A1
A1 mini

Triple-axis Tourbillon Model for Kit-007
Triple-axis Tourbillon Model for Kit-007
Designer
37.5 h
24 plates
4.3(153)

A1mini for small parts, require bigger printer for 5 largest parts
A1mini for small parts, require bigger printer for 5 largest parts
26.1 h
16 plates
4.1(7)

Gyroad infill, more strength, less filament
Gyroad infill, more strength, less filament
37.1 h
16 plates
3.3(4)

16 plates only
16 plates only
34.8 h
16 plates

Boost
1552
2668
339
52
5.7 k
14.9 k
Released

Description

This is a 3D-printed model of a triple-axis tourbillon, which is based on the tourbillon in a Jacob and Co. Twin Turbo Furious watch. A tourbillon is a mechanism employed to counteract the effects of gravity within a watch. This intricate model includes an escape wheel, triple-axis outer frame, and a base with an integrated motor. It functions on the same fundamental principles as a traditional watch tourbillon.

 

With precise assembly and calibration of the escape wheel, spring, and base drive gear, this tourbillon can smoothly rotate in three axes and maintain accurate timekeeping. The provided print settings in the Triple-axis Tourbillon Model for Kit-007.3mf file are already customized to ensure that all screw holes are clear and ready for assembly.

 

Printed plastic ‘screws’ are printed to scale and used as caps to cover the steel screws that actually hold it together.

Here is a real-time video of the tourbillion in action.

 

Note: There are two different designs defined for the Tourbillon: the 3MF version and the STL version.

 

The 3MF (Triple-axis Tourbillon Model for Kit-007.3mf file) version was designed specifically to work with Bambu printers and the Bambu slicer, and uses the Triple-axis Tourbillon Model Hardware Kit motor to drive it. It is a slightly modified version of the original STL tourbillon version. To build the 3MF version you only need to order the Triple-axis Tourbillon Model Hardware Kit, which provides all the non-printed parts (screws, bearings, shafts cut to length, motor, etc.) needed to build a complete model. Here is a video of assembling the 3MF version with the Bambu 007 hardware kit. Note that some of the sections in the Furious Build Notes PDF file below also apply to assembling the 3MF version, with the primary difference being the construction and components of the Base and the drive mechanism.

 

The STL (Raw Model Files) version is a set od files that was designed to work with any printer or slicer. It also uses a more complex Arduino controlled stepper motor mechanism to drive it. To build the STL version you can order a kit of all the non-printed parts here, otherwise you will need to order the parts listed in the Furious Build Notes PDF instructions individually. If you order the STL version of the hardware kit or buy the parts yourself, you will need to program the firmware into the Arduino before it will work. The Furious Build Notes PDF file below, describes the assembly process for the STL version. For some of the larger parts, ‘full’ (e.g., Base Outer Ring.STL) and ‘split’ versions (Base Outer Ring a.STL and Base Outer Ring b.STL) of the same part are included. The ‘full’ parts require at least a 220x220 bed for printing. The ‘split’ parts may be printed separately on a diagonal on a smaller bed, then glued together to form the larger part.

 

The following filaments can be used to create a model that looks like the pictured gold, silver, copper and black version:

Here is a video of the construction of the 007 kit. And some sections in the Furious Build Notes.PDF file may be useful for constructing the 007 kit.

 

Disclaimer: This model is part of the Creator Program, When you purchase the Triple-axis Tourbillon Model Components Kit through the links below, creators may earn an affiliate commission as a reward of their work. (The creator program is currently in the trial phase. The application is not yet open to public.)

 

The Hardware Kit for the Triple-axis Tourbillon Model for Kit-007.3mf file can be found here: Triple-axis Tourbillon Model Hardware Kit.


Documentation (1)

Assembly Guide (1)
Furious Build Notes.pdf

Bill of Materials

Bambu parts
Purchase from Bambu Store
(Available in China)

Comment & Rating (339)

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Alright, as a model, this thing is a work of art and I'll cherish it for a long time. As a kit, this thing is a disaster. First of all, the PDF instructions are garbage. Second, the video has typos and mistakes which makes it difficult to trust in places. I had to second guess the screw length in multiple places because the measurements it said didn't make any sense for the application or the screw used in the video. Most importantly, the model kit did not come with the right screws. Almost all of the longer screws are missing so I had to purchase extra. The L2 components are prone to breaking while printing, particularly L2A. I had to increase the walls to 4 and slow printing speed down to 50% to avoid arms snapping off during the last third of the print. Some of the holes for the pins had to be manually enlarged. Some of the components are printed in multiple sizes though only one of them are used and this isn't clear until you're starting assembly. If you're not paying careful attention, it makes it look like you've missed incorporating pieces. I love it. But I sincerely doubt the vast majority of people that get this kit with their printer will ever finish it. It's a shame. With more attention to detail and quality control of the kit components, this could be something really special. As it stands, this is incredibly frustrating borderline garbage that might, if you're extremely patient and careful, be something lovely.
The designer has replied
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Hi JS, Sorry to hear that you had problems with your build. I gave my original design files to the engineers at Bambu, and they created the 007 Hardware Kit and the Print Profile (3MF) for it. Other than a little bit of consulting, I wasn't very involved in their design process. I just ordered a Hardware Kit so I can build one for myself, and I will be working with Bambu to resolve the issues that you and others had with the parts and the Hardware Kit. How should the PDF instructions be improved? Please note that the PDF instructions were only written for assembling the Raw (STL) files version, and predated the Bambu (3MF) Print Profile version. So the Base and drive mechanisms are different. Relative to the L2 components being 'prone to breaking', I had the same problem with first the STL version that I built. I found that the non-Bambu Silk filament that I used for my original design had poor inter-layer adhesion. My solution was similar to yours, but I also set the print head temp to 220 C. Ideally, the default settings of the Print Profile should include these adjustments so you don't have to. I know about the 'hole size' problems, and I'm working on a fix. In the case of multiple components', which components are you referring to? Did you print the 3MF or the STL versions? Regards, Steve
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Replying to @mcmaven :
The spring_gear_shaft plate comes with three escapement mechanisms (arm + shaft, labeled as 'fork' in figure 9 of the PDF). From what I can tell, these are slightly different sizes and are meant in case one size snags. I used the 3MF print profile here. For a kit, the instructions should probably follow closely to the step-by-step model of the YouTube video as opposed to the combination instructions and info dump.. If all you're wanting to do is built the model this 32-page PDF is daunting.
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Replying to @JSPrinting :
I tried to make the original design work with any slicer, printer, or filament. I included the 3 forks with the original design to handle cases where the escape wheel prints slightly differently when sliced with a random slicer, and printed on different printers using a random filament. Ideally the Bambu system should eliminate this ambiguity. Assuming the combination of the Bambu printers, slicer, and their (tagged, pre-characterized, consistent) filaments, then printed parts should be more consistent and a single fork design will work for any Bambu make. It would be interesting to know which fork different users have selected, and how well it worked for them. One problem is that changing forks is a pain, because they are buried so deep in the design. It takes a lot of time to disassemble and reassemble the tourbillon. And thanks for the feedback. I think I will do another (shorter) version of the Build Notes that is targeted at the Kit. What do you think of putting it on Instructables, so users could add comments to individual steps if they found better ways of doing things? Steve
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I just completed this assembly. It is running and very much fun to watch. Thank you McMaven for your work. Printer: X1C as delvered. Filament: Bambu Silk My experience: Not an easy build. Part breakage and under sized holes are a pain. Several parts were reprinted. Pushing bearings into bores can cause layer seperation. Printed bearing shafts can break easily in bending or tension. Small parts seperate. All mating components seem to line up with no clearance or interference issues. Nice job there. There is a utube and a pdf to study. Yes there is some ambiguity in the information but enough information to complete the build. Patience. As for my #107 Bambu kit it came missing 6 screws. No spares. Motor was wired correctly. Improvement: Documentation. Part design for strength. And Bambu could supply a complete set of parts! A difficulty rating would help some builders. This assembly is a great effort by McMaven. Not an easy build, but a fun model to conquer and watch. Thanks again, Mike@dadstrainshop
The designer has replied
6
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Looks good! I'm glad that it worked for you. What print bed did you use? Did you change any of the default settings?
0
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Replying to @mcmaven :
I used the Bambu Cool Plate. I took the suggestions given and increased the wall thickness on the large hemispheres. No issue completing those prints on the first go round. The cylinder ends on the springs kept breaking off upon assembly. Printed 3 times each. Soaked the cylinder ends of the spring in thin CA glue and let dry. Success. The L3 frame bearing bore suffered layer seperation when the bearing was pressed in. Upped the wall thickness and manually clearanced the bore. Success. Please add that releif notch used on L3 frame to the L3 Frame support. Its an effective stress relief feature. The only other issue was the large L1 frame that carries the slim profile bearing. It kept breaking at the diameter transision from big od to small od. I ended up making a dowel to fit the bore and glued them back together. Success. The model and assembly have great opportunity for a remix and part tweaking. Successful kinematic multi-part assemblies can be a challenge for designers. Alignment of mating components is done really well, gears engage correctly and mechanical clearances are appropiate. Again my compliments to you. Cheers.
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McMaven! You've done amazing work here. I'm a mechanical engineer so this is a very fun - and challenging - build and I've learned a lot. This was the gateway drug for me to start looking into mechanical watch movements. I'm using the Bambu motor/hardware kit and didn't find it to be as bad as so many others. A few spare screws would be great though. BTW, part fit was excellent in most instances... very little work to be done in terms of massaging things for fitup using your designs w/ a Bambu X1C. A few lessons learned I'd like to pass along to everyone else: - All actual handmade mechanical watch mechanisms require tuning by the maker, so there is no way that McMaven or Bambu can make this plastic one perfect, especially since no two printers/filament combinations are exactly alike. Get ready to tune... that is part of the process and journey in this build. Don't give Bambu or McMaven a bad review because you couldn't get it to run. There are many variables in this mechanism, any one of could prevent it from running. The good news is that with patience and diagnostics, it will go. Getting it to run indefinitely is probably not an option for me... If I can hit 5 or 10 minutes, I'll be happy. - The escapement has to have absolutely zero resistance. If you're having issues, start here. Thankfully, it's only a 7 screw operation to get the L1 assembly out. The escapement should be hand-tuned, refined, then refined some more. Then it should be tested at all stages of assembly to ensure that the freedom of balance wheel rotation is maintained. It should oscillate a lot once the balance spring is installed prior to being mounted in the greater assembly. - Isolate variables when tuning. Don't change more than one parameter at a time. - Don't use PETG for the L1 timing spring. This threw everything off for the timing. I have since changed back to PLA with much better results. - Mark the gears in each set so they can be identified because when it comes time to tune, there can be some mix/match in the gearing ratios as long as they aren't too tight and there is adequate engagement. For instance 10-57 is a bit too slow (.175 ratio) but 11-56 is too fast (.196 ratio). A better ratio for my model is at 10-56 (.179 ratio). - Add timing marks to your L2 torque spring. I've had decent results fine tuning for longer run durations by tightening or loosening this spring. There are two ways to tighten the spring: by removing it from the hex shaft and winding before placing it back on. This allows for 60 deg winding increments. Or, by unscrewing the loading plate pin and tightening to the next slot. This allows for 45 deg tightening increments. Some permutation of these could help you fine tune the torque spring as required, though the torque spring doesn't have near the effect of tuning other variables like gear ratios. - One thing I didn't expect and only discovered today was was that during installation of the L1 module, the L1 balance spacer was getting pushed down along the balance shaft by the frame base... this would cause it to just touch the balance shaft bearing and take away the slightest amount of the balance wheel's ability to freewheel. This caused very rough ticking which translated back to having to compensate for it with faster gears to try and keep it running. But the balance wheel would lose energy and the mechanism would stop (and I'd have to quickly unplug). However, once I discovered that issue, I filed down the L1 balance spacer to provide a gap between it and the frame base. I guess I could have alternately drilled out the ID of the L1 balance spacer to make it have a looser fit (it's currently a tight fit) on the balance shaft, but it works doing what I did. - L3 bearing race inner must be printed in two pieces - no supports - and glued together with superglue and screws as alignment pins if you want it to run smoothly. Be cautious not to overtighten the bearing race per the PDF. It's helpful to run the turret/base assembly before mounting in the ball to ensure it is smooth and doesn't have any points that load up the motor.
(Edited)
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Any chance of a video showing how the escapement part should work? the L1 stuff?
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Replying to @andythilo :
https://youtu.be/wwvaGksyfUw?si=GZjJ0Uk_kwmf3wdq
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Replying to @andythilo :
If you get L1 setup correctly the timing wheel will oscillate several times before gradually slowing down. If it comes to any sort of sudden stop, you have resistance somewhere.
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Print Profile
Triple-axis Tourbillon Model for Kit-007
I have tried printing this 4 times. Each time is breaks in the same place. I have tried adjusting print settings, slowing it down, everything. Pretty bummed because this is the kit that came with my A1, but I can get past a couple of the parts. UPDATE: I have given up on this project. I have wasted so much filament trying to print an item that Bambu is providing files for. The true bummer is that I paid for this kit and now I am not only out the filament money, but money for the kit as well.
(Edited)
Support Issue
Strength Issue
Other Issues
The designer has replied
3
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For me it works, but I adjusted the layer hights at the upper areas where the angle is more flat. May that helps you too.
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Hi yodhanhunter, What brand/type of filament did you use? Also what printer? Thanks, Steve
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I have big problems printing the bigger Sphere on the A1. It fails every time, because one of the arches breaks. I have tried a lot of things, but nothing seems to help....
The designer has replied
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Hi Kevin, Try setting the wall thickness to 4 layers and slowing down the print speed to 80 %. You can also try increasing the filament flow rate by 10%. And if you are using a Silk filament, try setting the print temperature to at least 220 C. I was having the same problems until I made these changes. Regards, Steve
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I did that but then I got a layer shift multiple times. I printed it at work on the x1c.
(Edited)
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Hi Kevin, What brand/type of filament did you use? Also what printer? Thanks, Steve
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well got it to work just after many hours, yes it only works anticlockwise, so motor is wired wrong, need to swap the wires, still cant get the balance wheel working even tough it assembled correctly, yes i took it apart and reassembled it a few times. overall very disappointed , the instructions need to be better, and the video needs more detail as the video is what peaple will use to assemble it nice try Bambu but for the users your aiming at no good, try again, a lot of users that buy this kit or got it for free will be disappointed
The designer has replied
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Hi Leslie, I'm sorry that the design gave you a tough time. I'm working on a new release that will hopefully address the problems that you saw. And could you let me know if the motor looked like this after the wire swap? I suspect that the vendor supplying the motor/cable assemblies was not being consistent with the wire polarities. Thanks, Steve
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yes that's the motor that comes in the kit
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Replying to @leslie.rogers1 :
But do the red and black wires on your motor match those in the picture after you corrected them?
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Oh my friend, how complicated it was! Your explanations, photos and videos weren't bad, but it lacked a bit of clarity. I still managed to do it, thanks for the experience.
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Question for you! I’m trying to do the gold, silver, bronze version like yours. I can’t find a list anywhere that shows which plates to print in which colors. How did you determine which parts were which prior to assembly?
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Print Profile
Triple-axis Tourbillon Model for Kit-007
It ran the first time I plugged it in, though not smoothly because I didn’t secure a rod properly and it became disconnected from another part. This is an advanced print and I think many of the complaints are from people who do not have the skills or experience or patience required. One must be able to print dimensionally accurate parts and be able to troubleshoot assembly issues. I found the video to be adequate for assembly though it could definitely be better. Time to fix the loose rod!
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I ran out of room in my rating to offer advice. I split the L3 bearing race in half in Bambu Studio and added 4 connectors, specifically hexagonal dowels wider and shorter than the slicer defaults. I spaced them about 120° apart and placed two together for indexing. I printed each half with variable layer height skewed towards quality and joined the halves using CA glue and 4 clamps. Don’t print the bearing race as-is using supports. It’s much faster to assemble it from halves because there’s no clean up required.
(Edited)
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Why does plate 9 (L3) have a floating rectangle with "pull" on it?
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With support under the plate, you can pull off the support from the part a little easier. Works as a kind of handle
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Replying to @CarstenMK :
Ooh, clever...thanks!
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Replying to @CarstenMK :
That’s obviously the idea but the support held onto my print way harder than I could pull. I just ended up with more plastic to break away and waste. Luckily not too much.
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Hi, just printing and building but missing the screw caps (7mm - see pic). Does anybody found them or can give a hint. THX
The designer has replied
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Hi carstenMK, Look in the Raw Files for the "Screw 7mm End Cap.STL" file and print 6 of them. Hopefully this is what you are looking for. Regards, Steve
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Replying to @mcmaven :
Found it with the hint. THX Would be great if you have everything you need on the build plates, when you only download the projekt file ;-) Cheers Carsten
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Replying to @CarstenMK :
Agreed, I will add them in the next release. Steve
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