Uomo Vitruviano - Bricks Edition

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Uomo Vitruviano - Bricks Edition

Boost
12
13
1

Print Profile(2)

All
A1 mini
P1S
P1P
X1
X1 Carbon
X1E
A1

100%[0.4 Hotend]_0.2mm layer, 3 walls, 15% infill
100%[0.4 Hotend]_0.2mm layer, 3 walls, 15% infill
Designer
2.2 h
2 plates
5.0(1)

250%[0.4Hotend]_0.2mm layer, 3 walls, 15% infill
250%[0.4Hotend]_0.2mm layer, 3 walls, 15% infill
Designer
12.2 h
4 plates

Boost
12
13
1
0
5
1
Released

Description

04/15/2024
- National Made in Italy Day
- World Art Day
- Birth of the great master Leonardo Da Vinci


I therefore want to share with you, on this very date, a revisitation of Da Vinci's Vitruvian Man.
Hope you like it!

 

 

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

The Vitruvian Man (Italian: L'uomo vitruviano; [ˈlwɔːmo vitruˈvjaːno]) is a drawing by the Italian Renaissance artist and scientist Leonardo da Vinci, dated to c. 1490. Inspired by the writings of the ancient Roman architect Vitruvius, the drawing depicts a nude man in two superimposed positions with his arms and legs apart and inscribed in both a circle and square. It was described by the art historian Carmen C. Bambach as "justly ranked among the all-time iconic images of Western civilization".[1] Although not the only known drawing of a man inspired by the writings of Vitruvius, the work is a unique synthesis of artistic and scientific ideals and often considered an archetypal representation of the High Renaissance.

The drawing represents Leonardo's conception of ideal body proportions, originally derived from Vitruvius but influenced by his own measurements, the drawings of his contemporaries, and the De pictura treatise by Leon Battista Alberti. Leonardo produced the Vitruvian Man in Milan and the work was probably passed to his student Francesco Melzi. It later came into the possession of Venanzio de Pagave, who convinced the engraver Carlo Giuseppe Gerli to include it in a book of Leonardo's drawings, which widely disseminated the previously little-known image. It was later owned by Giuseppe Bossi, who wrote early scholarship on it, and eventually sold to the Gallerie dell'Accademia of Venice in 1822, where it has remained since. Due to its sensitivity to light, the drawing rarely goes on public display, but it was borrowed by the Louvre in 2019 for their exhibition marking the 500th anniversary of Leonardo's death.

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Some tests were done to find the perfect fit:
Once again, some post-print manual work will be needed.

 

Disclaimer:

This work by TheMiguelBi is licensed under Standard Digital File License

Strict non-commercial, personal use only license.

You are not allowed to Remix or Copy this model to other 3D printing websites without my permission.

 

Happy Printing!!
^_^

 

 

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100%[0.4 Hotend]_0.2mm layer, 3 walls, 15% infill
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This work is licensed under a Standard Digital File License.

You shall not share, sub-license, sell, rent, host, transfer, or distribute in any way the digital or 3D printed versions of this object, nor any other derivative work of this object in its digital or physical format (including - but not limited to - remixes of this object, and hosting on other digital platforms). The objects may not be used without permission in any way whatsoever in which you charge money, or collect fees.